2013 Vancouver Fringe Fest reviews: The Last Show You’ll Ever See

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“At the last trumpet the dead will be raised imperishable, and we will be changed.” — Corinthians 15:52

Meet Sara Liane Foster, a trombonist playing a concert that will be interrupted, several times, by the Apocalypse.

The first thing you will learn upon meeting Sara is that there are many versions of how the world could end, her favourite being the one described by Norse mythology. Funny and very well-researched, this show will have you pondering the role of the Valkyries while humming some Wagner.

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2013 Vancouver Fringe Festival reviews: In the Boudoir

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Straight from Brooklyn, Summer Shapiro’s one-woman show is a mess — but in a good way.

Possibly the only show at the Fringe to have the words “gunshots” and “funny” in its schedule description, In the Boudoir is a physical comedy act with a lot of heart and, yes, maybe a gun or two. After all, the love life of a young female clown is no laughing matter, except for the audience who watches it.

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Meanwhile cultivates connection to nature at Fringe fest

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Meanwhile is one of only a few outdoor shows at this year’s Fringe Festival. It also happens to be the first “one audience member at a time” show to have ever been staged at the festival.

That’s a mouthful, so let’s break it down: one audience member at a time means that only one person sees the show per performance.

Jessica Nelson, a UBC theatre alumni, is the writer and director of Meanwhile. She describes the show as an intimate experience that will allow the audience member to reconnect with nature.

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Wreck Beach Day unravels clothes and prejudice

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The stairway leading down to Wreck Beach has 473 steps, and although it might look like another trail from Marine Drive, those steps are all that lie between you and Canada’s first and largest clothing-optional beach.

This particular Sunday morning, the last one in August, Judy Williams is already at the top of the stairs at 9 a.m.

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A love song to Mexican culture: El Jinete comes to UBC

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Inspired by black and white movies from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema and a song that goes by the same name, El Jinete (The Rider) is a tribute to mariachi music, Mexican culture and love. The opera was written and directed by Mercedes Bátiz-Benét, the artistic director of Victoria-based Puente Theatre.

In an interview with The Ubyssey, Bátiz-Benét described the experience as an opportunity for Canadian audiences to see the origins of mariachi music. The story revolves around El Jinete, an embodiment of the mariachi archetype, who must travel from Mexico to the United States to rescue the love of his life after she is kidnapped.

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